ASMR Podcast by Vivian Dang and Tamana Gill



Transcript: Hello Sideline listeners! Welcome to our ASMR podcast.


Today we will be going into the depths of ASMR, otherwise known as “autonomous sensory meridian response” as a trend rising in popularity and its history. ASMR may be described as calming, pleasurable feeling often accompanied by a tingling sensation, by dictionary.com. This tingle is said to originate in a person’s head and spread to the spine and sometimes the limbs in response to stimulation.


The stimuli that trigger ASMR vary from person to person. Some of the most common ones include whispers, white noise, lips smacking, having a person’s complete attention (as in having one’s hair cut by a hairdresser), as well as brushing, chewing, tapping, scratching, and crinkling.

Some of the traits of ASMR that make it so effective in causing a reaction among people are its repetitive, methodical, steady pacing, and steady volume which act as a non-threatening and pleasure inducing sound.

The stimuli for ASMR (often called “triggers”) mostly fall into three main categories: tactile stimuli, visual stimuli, and auditory stimuli. Tactile stimuli includes light touch, massage, hair touching, grooming, and physical examination. Visual stimuli includes eye gazing and observing slow hand movements. Auditory stimuli includes vocal types, such as soft whispering, oral sounds, like mouth sounds, and object-related sounds, such as tapping, scratching, and cutting.

The benefits of ASMR include fighting insomnia, meditation/relaxation, and helping with anxiety or panic attacks.

The term ASMR was created by Jennifer Allen in 2010. She realized that many people also had the same experience with ASMR triggers and created the Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response Group on Facebook. This became the start of an upcoming popular trend we all know well as ASMR.

Though little is known behind the science of ASMR, we will continue to explore its benefits and will hopefully understand more about it in the future and now featuring a short segment of ASMR.

Thanks for listening!


References

https://www.sleep.org/articles/what-is-asmr/ https://www.theasmr.com/the-science-behind-asmr/ https://asmruniversity.com/origin-theory-of-asmr/ https://interestingengineering.com/asmr-understanding-the-science-behind-the-phenomenon

Do you have any questions? Let us know below.

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